• SAT's

    Strategies for College Boards, College Testing, FAQ's,
    http://www.collegeboard.org/
    http://www.powerprep.com/

    ACT Testing

    http://www.act.org/

     
     
    SAT I: Reasoning Test

    The SAT Reasoning Test (formerly SAT I: Reasoning Test), better known as the SAT, is a three-hour and forty-five-minute test that measures critical reading, writing, and mathematical reasoning skills students have developed over time and skills they need to be successful academically.

    The SAT is the best independent, standardized measure of a student's college readiness. It is standardized across all students, schools, and states, providing a common and objective scale for comparison. High school grades are a very useful indicator of how students perform in college, yet there is great variation in grading standards and course rigor within and across high schools.

    The SAT consists of ten sections, including a 25-minute essay, each timed separately. The essay will always be the first section of the SAT, and the 10-minute multiple-choice writing section will always be the final section. The five other 25-minute sections can appear in any order, as can the two 20-minute sections. Test takers sitting next to each other in the same testing session may have test books with entirely different sections.

    In addition, there is one 25-minute unscored section, known as the variable or equating section. This unscored section may be either a critical reading, math, or multiple-choice writing section. This unscored section does not count toward the final score, but is used to try out new questions for future editions of the SAT and to ensure that scores on new editions of the SAT are comparable to scores on earlier editions of the test.

    Each section of the SAT is scored on a scale of 200-800, and the writing section will contain two subscores. The SAT is typically taken by high school juniors and seniors. It is administered seven times a year in the U.S., Puerto Rico and U.S. Territories, and six times a year overseas.

    SAT II: Subject Tests

    Subject Tests (formerly SAT II: Subject Tests) are designed to measure students' knowledge and skills in particular subject areas, as well as their ability to apply that knowledge. Students take the Subject Tests to demonstrate to colleges their mastery of specific subjects like English, history, mathematics, science, and language. The tests are independent of any particular textbook or method of instruction. The tests' content evolves to reflect current trends in high school curricula, but the types of questions change little from year to year. Many colleges use the Subject Tests for admission, for course placement, and to advise students about course selection. Some colleges specify the Subject Tests they require for admission or placement; others allow applicants to choose which tests to take. Subject Tests fall into five general subject areas:

    English

    Literature

    History and Social Studies                                       

    United States History
    (formerly American History and Social Studies)
    World History

    Mathematics

    Mathematics Level 1 (formerly Mathematics IC)
    Mathematics Level 2 (formerly Mathematics IIC)

    Science

    Biology E/M
    Chemistry
    Physics

    Languages

    French
    French with Listening
    German
    German with Listening
    Modern Hebrew
    Italian
    Japanese with Listening
    Korean with Listening
    Latin
    Spanish
    Spanish with Listening

    What is the ACT?

    The ACT is a national college admission examination that consists of subject area tests in English, Mathematics, Reading and Science.

    The ACT Plus Writing includes the four subject area tests and a 30-minute Writing Test.

    ACT results are accepted by virtually all U.S. colleges and universities.

    The ACT includes 215 multiple-choice questions and takes approximately 3~hours and 30~minutes to complete with breaks (or just over four hours if you are taking the Writing Test). Actual testing time is 2~hours and 55~minutes (plus 30 minutes if you are taking the Writing Test).

    In the U.S., the ACT is administered on five national test dates—in October, December, February, April, and June. In selected states, the ACT is also offered in late September.

    The basic registration fee includes score reports for up to four college choices for which a valid code is listed at time of registration.

    The ACT tests are prepared according to the:

    • Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing, American Educational Research Association, American Psychological Association, & National Council on Measurement in Education (1985).
    • Code of Professional Responsibilities in Educational Measurement, National Council on Measurement in Education (1995).
    • Code of Fair Testing Practices in Education, Joint Committee on Testing Practices (1988).
     

    Fee Waivers

    SAT Fee Waiver Information 
    You are eligible for consideration for fee waivers if you are a high school junior or senior who meets the financial eligibility guidelines (such as participating in the Federal Free and Reduced Lunch/National School Lunch Program at your school). Your guidance counselor can share any additional eligibility guidelines with you.

    You must also fall into one of these two categories:

    • An American citizen or a foreign national testing in the United States, Puerto Rico, or U.S. territories
    • An American citizen living outside the United States

    If you are a homeschooled student in the United States, Puerto Rico, or U.S. territories who cannot afford to pay the test fees, you must provide proof of eligibility to your local high school or agency fee-waiver administrator or counselor. Only a school or agency counselor can provide you with an SAT fee-waiver card. If you qualify for an SAT fee waiver, you can also receive up to four Request for Waiver of College Application Fee forms to request application waivers from higher education institutions.

    ACT Fee Waiver Information
     If you can't afford the registration fee for the ACT (No Writing) or ACT Plus Writing, you may be eligible for a fee waiver. Funds are limited, and once they are gone, requests for waivers will be denied. To use a fee waiver, you must register by paper folder.

    To be eligible, you must meet all three of the following requirements:

    1.     You currently attend high school as a junior or senior.

    2.     You meet at least one indicator of economic need listed on the ACT fee waiver form. Information about these indicators and how to request fee waiver forms is mailed each fall to every high school. Ask your counselor for the information.

    3.     You may register only once with an ACT fee waiver, either in your junior or senior year. The waiver has been used once you register, even if you do not test.

    Fee waivers cover only the basic registration fee for either the ACT (No Writing) or the ACT Plus Writing, including up to four valid college choices (listed at the time of registration). Waivers do not cover test date changes, test center changes, or any other fees.
    For more information, see your high school guidance office.

    PLEASE NOTE: You can't request a waiver directly from ACT; you have to do it through your high school guidance office. Your registration folder won't be processed without a signed official ACT fee waiver form for the current testing year. Only ACT fee waiver forms will be accepted.

    • An American citizen or a foreign national testing in the United States, Puerto Rico, or U.S. territories
    • An American citizen living outside the United States

    If you are a homeschooled student in the United States, Puerto Rico, or U.S. territories who cannot afford to pay the test fees, you must provide proof of eligibility to your local high school or agency fee-waiver administrator or counselor. Only a school or agency counselor can provide you with an SAT fee-waiver card. If you qualify for an SAT fee waiver, you can also receive up to four Request for Waiver of College Application Fee forms to request application waivers from higher education institutions.