9/25/13 Teens pledge, ‘No texting’

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Williams High School student Christian Lovett takes the test drive on the computer simulator and practices texting while driving. While he was texting, his car crashed. This exercise at the Career and Technical Education Center last Thursday was part of the “No texting while driving” campaign across all the high schools in the Alamance-Burlington Schools. The students at each one of the high schools had an opportunity to sign a pledge.

Karen Carter/Mebane Enterprise

Williams High School student Christian Lovett takes the test drive on the computer simulator and practices texting while driving. While he was texting, his car crashed. This exercise at the Career and Technical Education Center last Thursday was part of the “No texting while driving” campaign across all the high schools in the Alamance-Burlington Schools. The students at each one of the high schools had an opportunity to sign a pledge.

Teens pledge, ‘No texting’
By KAREN CARTER, Enterprise Editor The Mebane Enterprise 9/25/13  
Reprinted with permission.

Isaiah Moore, a Cummings High School student-athlete and World Youth champion, signs the pledge, “No texting while driving.”  

Karen Carter / Mebane Enterprise

Isaiah Moore, a Cummings High School student-athlete and World Youth champion, signs the pledge, “No texting while driving.”

 

High school students in the Alamance-Burlington Schools pledged “No texting while driving” last Thursday.

Approximately 7,000 students at all the high schools in the district had the chance to “sign the pledge” to not text and drive after viewing a video about the tragic real-life results of teens sending or receiving a text while driving. Each school set up the video during lunch, and at Eastern, student council members sat at a table in the cafeteria while their peers took the pledge.

At the Career and Technical Education Center (CTEC), television screens in every classroom showed the 10-minute video, and then students gathered at the media center to use iPads to pledge not to text and drive.

Some students had the opportunity to test-drive an on-line computer simulator about texting while driving.

Isaiah Moore, a high school student at Cummings, is on the National Honor Society and Dream Team. He also holds the distinction of being third in the long jump for World Youth and sixth in hurdles for World Youth. He took the pledge at CTEC and said he would work to influence his peers.

Students watched as their peers sat at the online-computer simulator and made the test drive.

Williams High School student Christian Lovett did the test-drive on the computer simulator and crashed texting while driving. Western High School student Doug Maberry stopped driving before he crashed.

Williams High School student Steve Clarke crashed texting while driving. Nathaniel Frei, a student at Cummings, said he had never driven an auto, and he too crashed texting while driving.

Four national wireless service providers spearheaded the technology for the campaign and representing AT&T, Jim Tarman, regional director of external affairs, said,

“We believe texting while driving should be as unacceptable as drinking while driving.” He said the videos get the teens’ attention. “No text is worth a life. Forty-three percent of teenagers text while driving. Teens text five time more than adults on the average.”
Alamance-Burlington Schools Superintendent Dr. Lillie Cox has been an advocate for no texting while driving and she and her principals have given their support to the campaign through public speaking engagements and with the work of the principals at the local schools.

“At Alamance-Burlington Schools, we are committed to preparing all students to meet high academic standards and to become responsible citizens in a rapidly changing world,” said Cox. “One element of citizenship is conducting ourselves to show respect for others and for the laws of the land. I am so proud of the students who will be leading this effort on our campuses and all those who will commit to not text and drive.”In North Carolina, texting while driving is illegal; the law was passed in 2010.

Tarman presented statistics at the CTEC event. A ConnectSafely.org survey found that individuals that do speak up have a profound impact upon teens: 78 percent of teen drivers say they are likely not to text and drive if friends tell them it is wrong or stupid; 90 percent say they’d stop if a friend in the car asked them to; 93 percent would stop if a parent in the car asked them to; and 44 percent say they would be thankful if a passenger complained about their texting while driving.

“What do you say about texting while driving?”

Markus Brantley (Graham High School) “Watching the video, it’s a wake up call, kind of sad. People are dying because of car accidents texting and driving. I’ve never texted while driving. Why? You have to give it your full attention. Texting requires your full attention. Driving requires your full attention.” Brantley signed the pledge no texting while driving. “I have been texting while driving. I will not do it again after today. The impact: Everyone crashed in the simulator test drive. I don’t want that to be me.” Justin McGilvray, a student at Southern Alamance High School, signed the pledge no texting while driving.

Karen Carter / Mebane Enterprise

Markus Brantley (Graham High School)
“Watching the video, it’s a wake up call, kind of sad. People are dying because of car accidents texting and driving. I’ve never texted while driving. Why? You have to give it your full attention. Texting requires your full attention. Driving requires your full attention.” Brantley signed the pledge no texting while driving.
“I have been texting while driving. I will not do it again after today. The impact:
Everyone crashed in the simulator test drive. I don’t want that to be me.” Justin McGilvray, a student at Southern Alamance High School, signed the pledge no texting while driving.

Naomi Aramburu (Williams High School) “Watching the video, it’s sad, heart-breaking. Families are destroyed that way because of texting. Yes, I’ve done it. Now I’ll try not to. You can move your phone away or get a passenger to read a message to you.” Aramburu signed the pledge no texting while driving.

Karen Carter / Mebane Enterprise

Markus Brantley and Naomi Aramburu sign the pledge at CTEC.

Naomi Aramburu (Williams High School)
“Watching the video, it’s sad, heart-breaking. Families are destroyed that way because of texting. Yes, I’ve done it. Now I’ll try not to. You can move your phone away or get a passenger to read a message to you.” Aramburu signed the pledge no texting while driving.

Markus Brantley (Graham High School)
“Watching the video, it’s a wake up call, kind of sad. People are dying because of car accidents texting and driving. I’ve never texted while driving. Why? You have to give it your full attention. Texting requires your full attention. Driving requires your full attention.” Brantley signed the pledge no texting while driving.