2/26/14 Hands-on scientific experiments engage students’ minds

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Woodlawn Middle School students Isaiah Coltrane, Katelynn Johnson, Donovan Noell, Asalyn Spencer, and Sydney Weatherford experiment with testing which water makes more energy. NC State University graduate student Robert Clark (standing) is leading the students in testing the hypothesis. They are testing regular water, soap water, and salt water to determine which solution increases energy. Coltrane correctly identified that salt water is best because salt is an acid. When added to water, it made the energy go up.

Karen Carter / Mebane Enterprise

Woodlawn Middle School students Isaiah Coltrane, Katelynn Johnson, Donovan Noell, Asalyn Spencer, and Sydney Weatherford experiment with testing which water makes more energy. NC State University graduate student Robert Clark (standing) is leading the students in testing the hypothesis. They are testing regular water, soap water, and salt water to determine which solution increases energy. Coltrane correctly identified that salt water is best because salt is an acid. When added to water, it made the energy go up.

Hands-on scientific experiments engage students’ minds
By KAREN CARTER, Enterprise Editor, The Mebane Enterprise 2/26/14  
Reprinted with permission.

Byron Beddingfield, (not pictured) a North Carolina State University graduate student with FREEDM (Free Renewable Electrical Energy Management) Systems Center told the Enterprise that he has conducted hands-on experiments with students to show them a use of wire for orthodontics.

It involved nitinol wire, a wire that bends, said Beddingfield. “In hot water and an open flame, the nitinol wire springs back to its natural shape.”

Strategies that engage the minds, that’s my idea of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics), said Beddingfield.

Woodlawn Middle School students Cielo Garcia, Makayla Thomas, Elexus Oliver and Rebecca Lutskus are experimenting with different kinds of materials used in batteries to see which type of materials create more potential energy.

Karen Carter / Mebane Enterprise

Woodlawn Middle School students Cielo Garcia, Makayla Thomas, Elexus Oliver and Rebecca Lutskus are experimenting with different kinds of materials used in batteries to see which type of materials create more potential energy.