8/5/11 MAKING STEADY PROGRESS State releases 2010-11 test scores; data encouraging for most local schools

MAKING STEADY PROGRESS

MAKING STEADY PROGRESS

State releases 2010-11 test scores; data encouraging for most local schools
By Mike Wilder The Times-News 8/5/11     
Reprinted with permission.

 Close to half the schools in the Alamance-Burlington School System were designated Schools of Progress by the state based on student test scores for 2010-11.

 Information released by the N.C. Department of Public Instruction on Thursday shows 17 of the system’s 35 schools are in the Schools of Progress category. Those are schools in which students make at least expected growth — and may also have achieved high growth — when scores are compared to those from the previous year. Schools of Progress are also those in which 60 to 80 percent of students score at or above the proficiency level.

 Eight of the system’s schools were named Schools of Distinction. Those are schools in which students make either high or expected growth and in which at least 80 percent (but fewer than 90 percent) score at or above proficiency level.

 Five schools were designated as Priority Schools based on fewer than 60 percent of students scoring at proficiency level. The five schools have between 50 and 60 percent of students reaching proficiency.

 Five schools were in the No Recognition category, avoiding a negative label, but not reaching the growth or proficiency standards to get positive recognition.

 The system had no schools in the low-performing schools category, and also had no schools in the highest category, called Schools of Excellence, in which 90 percent or more of students score at or above the proficiency level.

 With nearly 50 percent of schools in the system in the Schools of Progress category, the Alamance-Burlington system had more schools with that designation than the statewide average of 40 percent. It had fewer schools in the higher Schools of Distinction category, a category that included 29 percent of schools statewide.

 Among the three charter schools in Alamance County:

 Clover Garden School met expected, but not high, growth. With 88.4 percent of students tested scoring at or above the proficiency level, the state named it a School of Distinction/Expected Growth. The school made adequate yearly progress.

 River Mill Academy met expected, but not high, growth. With 85.2 percent of students tested scoring at or above proficiency level, the state named it a School of Distinction/Expected Growth. The school made adequate yearly progress.

 The Hawbridge School met high growth. With 94.4 percent of students tested scoring at or above the proficiency level, the state named it an Honor School of Excellence/High Growth.